Tracking neutrinos in virtual reality

This podcast takes you on a #VR tour of the @MicroBooNE neutrino detector.  #science

  • Science communicator Andrew Glester visits the University of Oxford in the UK to meet members of the team behind VENu – a new smartphone app that explores the physics underlying the MicroBooNE neutrino detector at Fermilab in the US

    As recently reported on this website, the app can be used with virtual reality (VR) headsets, enabling users to observe particle tracks inside the detector and enjoy tutorials about the nature of neutrinos.

  • Developed by an international team of physicists, the app also has a game element whereby users can search for neutrino signals.
  • In the podcast, Glester asks the developers why they believe it is important for professional physicists to develop outreach tools such as VENu to inspire public interest in their work.
  • Eventually, such an app could even be used as a citizen science tool in which the public can help particle physicists to identify neutrino detections amid large data sets.
  • As Glester mentions in the podcast, VENu is not the only immersive video experience that might be of interest to physicists.

VR app lets you explore the inner workings of the MicroBooNE neutrino detector

@Fermilab: This podcast takes you on a #VR tour of the @MicroBooNE neutrino detector. #science

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In this video you will learn how to create POSCAR files in Virtual NanoLab and how to create input files for VASP calculations using the VASP Scripter of Virtual NanoLab.

This month’s podcast takes you on a virtual reality tour of a neutrino detector. Science communicator Andrew Glester visits the University of Oxford in the UK to meet members of the team behind VENu – a new smartphone app that explores the physics underlying the MicroBooNE neutrino detector at Fermilab in the US

As recently reported on this website, the app can be used with virtual reality (VR) headsets, enabling users to observe particle tracks inside the detector and enjoy tutorials about the nature of neutrinos. It can be downloaded free of charge from the App Store and Google Play.

Developed by an international team of physicists, the app also has a game element whereby users can search for neutrino signals. In the podcast, Glester asks the developers why they believe it is important for professional physicists to develop outreach tools such as VENu to inspire public interest in their work. Not one to rest on his laurels, the app’s chief developer Marco Del Tutto is already considering ways in which the group can further develop the app. Eventually, such an app could even be used as a citizen science tool in which the public can help particle physicists to identify neutrino detections amid large data sets.

As Glester mentions in the podcast, VENu is not the only immersive video experience that might be of interest to physicists. CMS-cardboard is a VR visualization of the CMS detector at CERN’s large hadron collider (LHC). Meanwhile, NASA has created a 360-degree artist’s impression of the surface of one of the seven planets recently discovered around the TRAPPIST-1 star.

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I felt like I was in Oxford myself speaking with the scientists about neutrinos and their research. And I’m glad you gave a mention to CMS Cardboard as well, which was essentially developed over a weekend during a hackthon nearly two years ago. Keep up the podcasting!

Thanks so much for your feedback. I love the CMS cardboard. I also love how you felt like you were “virtually” in Oxford yourself.

A great introduction to Neutrinos, really enjoyed the relaxed and personal style to this podcast. Keep it up! oh, I have also just got lost on TRAPPIST-1d! Lunch hour gone!

A great introduction to Neutrinos, really enjoyed the relaxed and personal style to this podcast. Keep it up! oh, I have also just got lost on TRAPPIST-1d! Lunch hour gone!

Who needs lunch hours on Earth anyway? Thanks so much for your feedback.

We’re really pleased with the positive feedback these podcasts are receiving. Share them with your friends and stay tuned for more from Andrew next month!

This podcast made even me understand neutrinos (albeit only a tiny bit) – brilliantly done!

I’m sure you’re being overly modest, Johanderthal but thank you. That’s great to hear.

Really enjoyed this podcast. Very informative and entertaining. I will definitely be subscribing so that I can hear more from Andrew and his interviewees and contributors. Keep up the great work!

Tracking neutrinos in virtual reality

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