Augmented & Virtual Reality News Source

University of Leeds Conducts Virtual Reality Tests On Young Children – VRFocus

Does VR cause health issues in the young? The University of Leeds did a test:

  • When it comes to virtual reality (VR) and children the line has been pretty clear since the technology had its ‘second coming’ – VR devices for children have a recommended age limit.
  • Sony Interactive Entertainment’s (SIE’s) PlayStation VR goes slightly lower with a recommentation the HMD is not suitable for children under 12.
  • This is sespecially true as there are a number of interested parties in bringing VR to children and the technology becoming more inclusive.
  • The research team tested 20 children in the 8 to 12 year old bracket following a 20 minute session playing a VR game.
  • One child had difficulty balancing afterwards, described in the report as a “drastic worsening” of their condition before entering VR.

When it comes to virtual reality (VR) and children the line has been pretty clear since the technology had its ‘second coming’ – VR devices for children have a recommended age limit.  Botht the Oculus Rift and the Samsung Gear VR head mounted displays (HMDs) operate with an recommended age rating of 13 years old. Sony Interactive Entertainment’s (SIE’s) PlayStation VR goes slightly lower with a recommentation the HMD is not suitable for children under 12. The HTC Vive on the other hand does not mention an age as such, but does note that it might not be suitable for children.

When it comes to virtual reality (VR) and children the line has been pretty clear since the technology had its ‘second coming’ – VR devices for children have a recommended age limit.  Botht the Oculus Rift and the Samsung Gear VR head mounted displays (HMDs) operate with an recommended age rating of 13 years old. Sony Interactive Entertainment’s (SIE’s) PlayStation VR goes slightly lower with a recommentation the HMD is not suitable for children under 12. The HTC Vive on the other hand does not mention an age as such, but does note that it might not be suitable for children.

Something of a concensus, at least, there between the four main VR HMD manufacturers.  But what are the real risks? A child’s body is still maturing and developing. It simply might not be ready, either in terms of the brain or the eyes to adequately cope. This is a universally understood point. But there are other factors, such as the weight of the HMD and the impact on the muscles in the neck; the design of an HMD is, after all not typically aimed at a child. Consdiering all this there is, perhaps understandably, not much in the way of research done in this field there are questions that need answering.

This is sespecially true as there are a number of interested parties in bringing VR to children and the technology becoming more inclusive. Everything we have all seen to date…

University of Leeds Conducts Virtual Reality Tests On Young Children – VRFocus

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